Exhibition: Queer British Art at Tate Britain

Henry Scott Tuke: Boy on a Beach, 1912
Henry Scott Tuke: Boy on a Beach, 1912

This summer Tate Britain are staging the first major exhibition that is dedicated to gay British art.

The exhibition is timed to commemorate the fact that male homosexuality was decriminalised (well, partially…) in Britain 50 years ago this year.

As expected from the Tate, this full-scale exhibition is a thorough and impressive journey through works of art from 1861–1967, all of which have some kind of lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans and queer theme or identity .

The show also explores how the artists expressed themselves during periods of intense homophobia, and when established assumptions about gender and sexuality were being questioned and transformed.

The range is stunning, with paintings, drawings, sculpture, photographs and film on display, from British artists including John Singer Sargent, David Hockney (who also has a huge retrospective running at the Tate at the same time), Simeon Solomon, Henry Scott Tuke, Keith Vaughan, William Strang, Dora Carrington and Duncan Grant.

5 April to 1 October 2017